Use of High Glucosinolate Mustard as an Organic Biofumigant in Vegetable Crops

Join eOrganic for a webinar on April 11, 2017 on using high glucosinolate mustard as an organic biofumigant in vegetable crops. This webinar will take place at 2 PM Eastern Times, 1 PM Central, 12 PM Mountain, 11 AM Pacific Time. It's free and open to the public, and advance registration is required.

Register now at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8878799766349704962

 

About the Webinar

Brassica plants, including mustards, contain glucosinolates that, when broken down, produce compounds that can reduce weed pressure, insect pests, populations of parasitic nematodes, and soil-borne pathogens such as Pythium, Rhizoctonia, Sclerotinia, Verticillium, and Phytophthora. In this webinar, we’ll address the use of mustard cover crops that have been bred specifically to have high glucosinolate concentrations and act as a biofumigant in crops like potatoes, peppers, black beans, and strawberries.

About the Presenters

Webinar presenters include Heather Darby and Abha Gupta, University of Vermont Extension; and Katie Campbell-Nelson, University of Massachusetts.

Katie Campbell-Nelson is an Extension educator for the University of Massachusetts Vegetable Program with a background in soil and nutrient management and sustainable agriculture. She conducts research and provides educational programming for vegetable farmers in Massachusetts and is an editor of Vegetable Notes, a publication with practical and up-to-date research-based information for vegetable growers.

Dr. Heather Darby is an agronomic and soils specialist at the University of Vermont Extension where she conducts applied research and farmer outreach programs on farm-based fuel, cover crops and soil health, nutrient management, organic livestock forages, and grain production systems in the Northeast. She also operates a certified organic vegetable farm with her family in northern Vermont.

Abha Gupta is a crops and soils coordinator with the University of Vermont Extension Northwest Crops and Soils Program where she helps to conduct soil health research and nutrient management information on vegetable production systems.

System Requirements

View detailed system requirements here. Please connect to the webinar 10 minutes in advance, as the webinar program will require you to download software. To test your connection in advance, go here. You can either listen via your computer speakers or call in by phone (toll call). Java needs to be installed and working on your computer to join the webinar. If you are running Mac OSU with Safari, please test your Java at http://java.com/en/download/testjava.jsp prior to joining the webinar, and if it isn't working, try Firefox or Chrome.


Created by Alice Formiga

Primary Audience: Not Set