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Finding and following on online networks

This is the third webinar in the three-part series "Getting online information to come to you," but stands alone, so feel free to attend, regardless of whether or not you participate in the others.

Whether it’s figuring out the next book to read, movie to see, or contractor to hire (for example), we each have trusted advisors we turn to with questions on a particular topic. Social networks (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+) can be used to find people whose opinions you trust or who have similar interests. By tuning in to what they are talking about and engaging with them, we can discover information that we would have had difficulty finding on our own. This webinar will explore how online networks can be used to find interesting people and topics to expand your knowledge and discover hard to find information.

Other webinars in the series:
- Creating your own Learning Network (http://learn.extension.org/events/471) - April 4, 2012 11AM EST
- RSS feeds and feedreaders (http://learn.extension.org/events/472) - April 11, 2012 11AM EST

Created by Stephen Judd

7 Comments

Given the basic context of the session and the time allotted, I didn't think the view points from other disciplines *needed* to be included, but the session was made richer because of it. Again, great job today! I continue to be impressed by the value of what eXtension and the MFLN & NetLit groups are bringing to the community...

Thumb_profile_headshot_4 Jerry Buchko

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about 2 years ago

I don't think I understand the question on this page about feeling more hopeful after attending this session. What does that question have to do with "Finding and following on online networks"?

Thumb_p8300416 Terry Meisenbach

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about 2 years ago

I'm pretty sure the 'sense making' questions are randomly generated. Perhaps this is something that should be discussed with the programming group.

Thumb_2011bust-square-150px John Dorner

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about 2 years ago

I'm wondering if the question is attempting to assess the psychological/emotional impact or effect of the session experience on participants, rather than assessing a factor directly related to the topic itself?

Thumb_profile_headshot_4 Jerry Buchko

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about 2 years ago

Jerry...that might be the case; it just seemed out of place considering the topic. It was an excellent session...

Thumb_p8300416 Terry Meisenbach

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about 2 years ago

For the sake of sensemaking, I'll say I found the question a bit unexpected as well. It's not the kind of assessment question I've typically seen posed for eXtension webinars, but I think it would be an intriguing direction of inquiry to take if the intention were to assess psychological/emotional effect. Does participation in these kinds of webinars in general have any impact/effect on participant/community well-being? How might this compare to the impact/effect on participants of those webinars expressly focused on topics directly related to well-being?

Thumb_profile_headshot_4 Jerry Buchko

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about 2 years ago

Perhaps the 'feeling hopeful' question was trying to address the sense that many feel OVERWHELMED by all new ways to get information and was asking the question ts see if the presentation gave them doable ideas to start accessing information.

Thumb_image Donna Shanklin

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1 person up-voted this

about 2 years ago